HM-10 Bluetooth 4 BLE Modules

Updated 2017-11-14.
Since I first posted about the HM-10 the firmware has been update several times and some of the commands have changed. Therefore, I decided to redo the guide. For this update I am using modules with firmware 5.49 (regular) except the one I am using for the firmware update guide which started with v5.40 and becomes 5.47.

Firmware version 5.49 is now available from the Jinan Huamao website. There are 2 versions; regular and long name. The regular firmware does not have an updated read me so I don’t know what changes, if any, have been made. The long name firmware adds, you guessed it, long names. Device names can now be up to 29 characters. At the same time the iBeacon function and the ANCS function have been removed. Unless you desperately need long names I suggest you stay with the regular firmware.

2017-07-26 Firmware 5.50 now available.
2017-09.01 Firmware 6.01 now available (bug fixes, no new commands)
2017-10.xx Firmware 6.03 now available Extended the CO command. Added AT+MPIO (multi PIO control). See the readme file for details. The manual has not been updated at this time (Nov 2017).

2018-03-24. Jinan Huamao support say that the HM-10 (original ones, not copies) are compatible with Android 8. I do not have Android 8 so have not tried and cannot confirm.

Bluetooth 4 BLE
HM-10 Services and Characteristics
Get Started With the HM-10
Getting an Arduino talking to the HM-10
HM-10 AT Commands: Using the Arduino’s serial monitor to talk to the HM-10
Scanning for other HM-10s
Arduino to Arduino using HM-10s
HM-10 to HM-10: Turning an LED on and off
HM-10 Programmable Pins
HM-10 Stand-alone MODE 2 and Controlling LEDs
HM-10 Stand-alone: Remote Light Sensor
HM-10: Add a second Custom Characteristic
Using the HM-10 with non-HM-10 modules (not fully working)
HM-10 as an iBeacon
HM-10 Updating the firmware
HM-10 Downloads




The HM-10 is a small 3.3v SMD Bluetooth 4.0 BLE module based on the TI CC2540 or CC2541 Bluetooth SOC (System On Chip). The HM-10 is made by Jinan Huamao and is one of many Bluetooth devices they produce including the HM-11 which is operationally the same as the HM-10 but has a smaller footprint with fewer pins broken out.

There are 2 versions of the HM-10; the HM-10C and the HM-10S

The HM-10C does not have the pads along the bottom (the usb connections) and has 26 pads instead of 34 which makes it a little cheaper to produce. There may be other differences (such as the type of crystal used) due to the date of manufacture. Operationally the two are the same though.

HM-10 Basic specs

  • +2.5v to +3.3v
  • Requires up to 50mA
  • Uses around 9mA when in an active state
  • Use 50-200uA when asleep
  • RF power: -23dbm, -6dbm, 0dbm, 6dbm
  • Bluetooth version 4.0 BLE
  • Default baud rate for the serial connection is 9600
  • Default PIN is 000000
  • Default name is HMSoft
  • Based on the CC2540 or the CC2541 chip

The latest HM-10s all appear to the the CC2541 chip. This is the same as the CC2540 except it is lower power and has a shorter range. The CC254x is based on the 8051 and runs at 32MHz.

The HM-10 is has become a very popular Bluetooth 4 BLE module for use with the Arduino. In part due to the standard UART serial connection that makes it fairly straight forward to connect to an Arduino. The UART layer is a good thing and a bad thing, it allows ease of use but it hides the BLE layer so you have no control over the actual BLE side of things. The HM-10 is Bluetooth version 4.0 only. This means it cannot connect to Bluetooth 2/2.1 modules such as the HC-06 and HC-05.

The HM-10 is controlled via AT commands which are sent over the serial UART connection. There are a host of commands, some simple, some more complex, and these are covered later.

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HC-06 hc01.comV2.0



The latest zs-040 HC-06 modules have an updated firmware, hc01.comV2.0. This firmware has the following defaults:
– baud rate = 9600
– password = 1234
– nl/cr line endings not required.
– AT commands are required to be in upper case
– Firmware version = hc01.comV2.0
– Name = HC-06
– No parity
– SLAVE mode

Since the Bluetooth hardware is the same as the previous zs-040 HC-06s the Bluetooth specs are also the same. Bluetooth 2.0 EDR, SSP.
These use a slightly different BT module than the other zs-040 boards and there is a blue LED at the top left of the daughter board.
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Arduino to Arduino by Bluetooth

Updated 12.06.2016: Added example 2

In the Connecting 2 Arduinos by Bluetooth using a HC-05 and a HC-06: Pair, Bind, and Link post I explained how to connect a HC-05 to a HC-06 so that when powered they automatically made a connection. Here we look at using that connection to get Arduinos talking over Bluetooth. Before continuing you need to have the Arduinos and BT modules set up as per the previous post. Here I am using 2 HC-05s. One in master mode the other in slave mode. The setup process for the slave mode HC-05 is the same as the HC-06 in the previous post.


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Bluetooth Modules

Updated: 21.07.2017

new Bluetooth Modules

There are many very similar Bluetooth modules available and sometimes it can be difficult finding out, not only which one you have, but also how yo use them. Here I look at some of the modules I have and try to show the basic settings.

Getting Started
Connecting To A Computer
Android Apps

Bluetooth 2.0/2.1 EDR Modules
    HC-06 (ZG-B23090W) Bluetooth 2.0 EDR modules
    HC-05 (ZG-B23090W) Bluetooth 2.0 EDR modules
    SPP-C HC-06 / BT06 HC-06
    HC-06 zs-040 v2.0
    HC-05 zs-040 V2.1
    HC-05 FC-114 and HC-06 FC-114
    HC-05 and HC-06 zs-040 Bluetooth modules

Bluetooth 4 / BLE Modules
    BT05-A mini BLE Bluetooth V4.0 iBeacon
    AT-09 Bluetooth V4.0 CC2541

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ESP8266-01 Bread Board Adapter

Update: 2017-01-15
Although the below adaptor works I found it inconvenient. The rear connectors are blocked by the ESP8288. I therefore built a ESP8266 bread board adaptor version 2

After a lengthy pause I have started playing with the ESP8266 modules again and I was getting annoyed by all the wires when using them on a bread board. So, like others before me, I built a small bread board adapter.


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Android MIT App Inventor – Auto Connect To Bluetooth

In a previous post I showed how to connect an app inventor Android app to a Bluetooth module connected to an Arduino to control an LED. See Turning a LED on and off with an Arduino, a HC-06 and Android

A few people have asked how to make it so that the app auto-connect to the Arduino on start up and I thought I would offer my solution. This example adds to the previous guide.

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App Inventor 2 Pseudo Screens

As you may have noticed from some of the other posts, I use App Inventor 2 to create Android apps. I do not have time to learn JAVA programming and I found App Inventor an easy way to get in to the world of Android apps. AI2 is not perfect. It is designed as a teaching aid rather than a fully featured Android programming language and as such there are many things missing. However, you can create some surprisingly advanced apps with it. The Arduino Bluetooth Control and the dropController apps were created in AI2 as is the new Bluetooth Control Panel app.

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HC-05 FC-114 and HC-06 FC-114. Part 3 – Master Mode and Auto Connect

Update 19.09.2015
The FC-114 boards I have have the Bolutek firmware. User DS has reported that he/she has FC-114 boards that have the linvorV1.8 firmware. So if the below does not work for you then check what firmware you have.

I may be missing something but I can not get the HC-05 FC-114 boards in to Master Mode and connect to other BT devices with just AT commands. The modules say they have accepted the commands, such as AT+ROLE1 but when I try to connect to other modules I get the error message “Can only be used in Lord Mode”.

The modules accept “AT+ROLE1″ and report they have changed mode but they haven’t really.

In an earlier post I mentioned that it looks likes pin 27 or pin 28 has to be pulled HIGH to enter Master Mode and this does indeed seem to be the case. Everything I have tried without pulling the pin(s) HIGH has failed.

They reply with “OK” and if you interrogate with “AT+ROLE” they report “+ROLE=1″ but they are actually still in Slave Mode.

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HC-05 FC-114 and HC-06 FC-114. Part 2 – Basic AT commands

Update 19.09.2015
The FC-114 boards I have have the Bolutek firmware. User DS has reported that he/she has FC-114 boards that have the linvorV1.8 firmware. So if the below does not work for you then check what firmware you have.

Since the HC-05 FC-114s and the HC-06 FC-11s share the same firmware the following should work on either module.

The default setting on start up is Slave Mode waiting for pairing or a connection and also accepting AT commands. This means it is fairly simply to start using AT commands.

HC-05 FC-114 & HC-06 FC-114_1200

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HC-05 FC-114 and HC-06 FC-114. First Look

I have just received some new HC-05 and HC-06 Bluetooth modules. These were sold as zs-040s which is the module I actually wanted but I received modules marked FC-114. They share the same breakout board as the zs-040 but have different pins soldered between the Bluetooth module and the breakout board and have a very different firmware.


The small push button switch still has traces to pin 34 and still pulls pin 34 HIGH, however, on the FC-114 boards, pin 34 is a regular IO pin and closing the button switch doesn’t do anything. On the zs-040 boards, closing the button switch and pulling pin 34 HIGH puts the modules in to AT mode. Since the FC-114 starts in AT mode this is no big loss.

It took me a while to figure out the differences.
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HC-05 fs-040 State Pin

This post follows on from Arduino With HC-05 Bluetooth Module in Slave Mode

The STATE pin on the HC-05 zs050 board is connected to the LED 2 pin on the small bluetooth module and the LED 2 pin is used to indicate when there is an active connection. This means the Arduino can connect to the STATE pin and determine when we have a connection. The STATE pin is LOW when the HC-05 is not connected and HIGH when the HC-05 is connected.

As a quick visual indicator you can put a LED + suitable resistor on the STATE pin. When the module is connected the LED will light.

You can also use the Arduino to read the value of the STATE pin.

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Arduino and Visual Basic Part 3: Controlling an Arduino

I am still very new to Visual Basic and I have been surprised at how quickly you can develop working apps. My first attempt resulted in a very basic app to receive data from the Arduino which taught me the basics of serial communication in VB. The next step is two way communication and controlling the Arduino from the VB program. I already have a similar project arduinoBTcontrol, where the Arduino is controlled from an Android app over Bluetooth. So all I need do is tweek the Arduino sketch and recreate the Android app in VB.

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Arduino and Visual Basic Part 2: Receiving Data From the Arduino

This post continues from Arduino and Visual Basic Part 1: Receiving Data From the Arduino

In the previous post we received a stream of data from the Arduino and displayed it inside a Visual Basic text box. This is all well and good but we did not know what the data was, we simply received it and displayed it.

The next step is to send data that has some kind of meaning and display it in an appropriate field. This could be a temperature, a wind speed, a switch state or anything else. In the following example I am using a 1 wire temperature probe (it’s actually got 2 wires…), a potentiometer and a button switch.

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Arduino and Visual Basic Part 1: Receiving Data From the Arduino

After creating the dropControllerBT app and realizing how much easier controlling the dropController device is through the app I started to think about creating a PC app. I haven’t done any PC programming for many years and so I looked at what various options are currently available. Visual Basic kept being recommended for ease of use and quick development. Visual Basic comes as part of Microsoft’s Visual Studio Suite and I initially download and played with Visual Studio Express which in turn lead to Visual Studio Community. Both are free for personal use.

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